Monday, May 30, 2016

GYOPO - Group Show at Industry Gallery Pacific Design Center, West Hollywood, California

The exhibition “GYOPO” showcases an artistic dialogue between seven Korean-American artists who convey their unique perspectives as Gyopo in 21st century America. Artist Ray Choi explains, “We stand at a unique point in time for a generation of Koreans/Americans establishing their places in the world, a majority of whom now, have other cultural associations taking precedent over their ethnicity.” He describes “Gyopo”, as a term used to identify and subsequently, categorize Korean descendents who were either born or live outside of their homeland. The term has also been known to carry along negative implications that these Koreans have lost touch with their cultural roots, which only furthers the division between native Koreans and Gyopo. This term serves as a vestigial reflection of Korea in the modern world as a result of generations of strife and exodus.

The works address the issues of conflict, creation, and cultural ambiguity that arises from living and working as Gyopo artists. The show includes sculptures [Ray Choi, Grace Eunchong Lee, John Hourihan and Eunbi Erica Cho] and paintings [Joseph Lee, Anna Chung, and Maia Lee]. “Gyopo” not only questions issues of identity in the Korean context, but what role “ethnicity” itself plays in an increasingly multicultural globalized world.

"GYOPO" opens at Industry Gallery Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Ave, B270, Los Angeles, CA 90069, on May 27th, 2016 from 5:00pm-9:30pm. For more information email info@industrygallery.net.
http://www.industrygallery.net/













Monday, May 16, 2016

C.O.L.A. (City of Los Angeles) Artists Fellowship Recipients 2016 Exhibition, Barnsdall Park, Los Angeles, California

C.O.L.A. 2016

INDIVIDUAL ARTIST FELLOWSHIPS EXHIBITION
MAY 15 – JULY 3, 2016

OPENING RECEPTION SUNDAY, MAY 15, 2-5 PM
The City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and
the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery
Presents the premiere of new works by
ARTISTS
Paolo Davanzo
Marsian De Lellis
Keiko Fukazawa
Megan Geckler
Won Ju Lim
Sarah Maclay
Blue McRight
Sandeep Mukherjee
Christine Nguyen
Claudia Rodriguez
Jim Skuldt
Lynne Thompson
EXHIBITION-RELATED EVENTS
SATURDAY, May 21, at 2 pm
Christine Nguyen / Sandeep Mukherjee
SATURDAY, June 4, at 2 pm
Megan Geckler with Shana Nys Dambrot
Marsian De Lellis with Alison de Fren
SATURDAY, June 18, at 2 pm
Blue McRight with Kay Whitney
SATURDAY, June 25, at 2 pm
Paolo Davanzo / Won Ju Lim
Family Art Workshop
No reservations are necessary and art supplies will be provided
SATURDAY, June 11, 1-4 PM
COLA LIT READING
SATURDAY, June 11, at 7 pm
Sarah Maclay
Claudia Rodriguez
Lynne Thompson
Grand Performances California Plaza
300 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90071
213.687.2190
grandperformances.org
GALLERY HOURS: Thurs. to Sun. 12-5 PM
FREE ADMISSION TO GALLERY AND ALL EVENTS
#COLA16  #LAMAGallery


Marsian De Lellis

Paolo Davanzo

Christine Nguyen

Christine Nguyen

Sandeep Mekherjee

Blue McRight

Won Ju Lim
Keiko Fukazawa

Won Ju Lim
Paolo Davanzo
Jim Skuldt

Jim Skuldt
Megan Geckler

Megan Geckler
Blue McRight

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

"The Gloaming" a group show at Visitor Welcome Center, Los Angeles, CA


"The Gloaming" is a group show, which brings together Alexandra Pacheco Garcia, Jenny Yurshansky and Karen Lee, that explores the confluence of photography, form and the dichotomy of light and dark. The word "Gloaming" is another word for twilight or sunset, which is the time between when the sun sets and the moment it become night. The artists in "The Gloaming" are interested in the photographic, and how the photographic play between light and dark. When looking at the work, the viewer becomes aware of the shadow. The shadow is where light and dark meet. It is the image and its opposite. There is a Gothic sensibility to the works; a 19th century approach where the experimental in photographic processes ultimately lead to the image based culture that is prevalent in the 21st century. This is an excellent show, and is worth the visit. Go see.  

Below is an except from the curator's statement. 

[The artists in "The Gloaming"] inhabit photographic practices that are in the thrall of the aura as described by Walter Benjamin, where the existence of the work of art with reference to its aura is never entirely separated from its ritual function. The works are technical, romantic, and confound traditional lens-to-print based photography. In a variety of approaches, each of these artists has used an unusual method that nears the alchemical. It is through this way of working that each allows for a phenomenological resonance to be achieved within this medium, shrugging off the need to be bound to the realm of the real and make room to explore the notions of memory, time, and physical absence as a means of tracing personal and allegorical histories. These artists share a language of loss, an index of the disappeared, and the shadow of mourning all in a manner that is enfolded within a contemporary practice. The lacuna in the works opens a portal through which the moment of contemplation is stretched and expanded, creating a space to consider and inhabit what has come before, what will be, and what is fundamentally needed to embrace the void.



~faith~

Though this triad of artists avoid the conventional lens, each cradles the idea of image making with an extraneous clarity that can only be achieved through allowing oneself to succumb to the darkness. When a loved one is lost, the world embodies and exhibits their singularity: shoveling it throughout the present, unearthing the past, while burying the future.

While the botanical realms of the earth are forcefully aligned with the needs of humans, Yurshansky continues to forage her imaginary; laying to rest her past, while petrifying her passion for the unlikely survivor who strategically traverses lush but exclusive environments. Lee’s photographs encased in beeswax, posit that an analog photo’s aura lies not in a discernible image but in it having stood witness to a particular time and place. Both Lee and Yurshansky pay homage to the massive windows and the light which they offer the space. Whereas Lee builds an altar, a photosensitive fabric sculpture that evolves with the exhibition, Yurshansky reveals the sombering effects if that light is taken away. Take it away, take faith away, and you are left with nothing; a black hole, a gaping wound in need of healing. Pacheco Garcia’s large-scale kirlian prints made from blood, oil and holy water, are cosmic touches of confidence reborn. When a trusted photographic medium that once captured love, could only show pain, Pacheco Garcia felt a deep need to realign her faith with her passion. Her illustrious results on paper begin with the artist standing alone in the dark, in the void, with nothing but fire at her fingertips and scar tissue to burn. Let there be light and then there was.


Exhibition runs through May 28th 
Open hours; Weds-Sat 12 - 6pm

Visitor Welcome Center
3006 W 7th St., Suite 200A, 
Los Angeles, CA 90005
Telephone: 213.703.1914 / 
Email: info@visitorwelcomecenter.org

Alexandra Pacheco Garcia is an artist and educator living and working in Los Angeles, California. Alexandra received her BFA in photography from New York University and a Masters in Studio Art from the University of California, Irvine. Her current project, From the Archives of Elena C, based on the life of a fictional spiritual medium and political radical living in 1970s Puerto Rico, will be featured in an upcoming solo show at The Angeles Gate Gallery in San Pedro, California in September 2016.

http://alexandrapachecogarcia.com/

Born in Rome via Moldova, Jenny Yurshansky received her MFA in Visual Art from UC Irvine and participated in the post‐graduate Critical Studies course at the Malmö Art Academy. This spring she has been invited by Yiddishkayt as a guest artist in Moldova, where she will begin research on her family history, followed by a residency at Art Initiative Tokyo in the fall. Yurshansky’s forthcoming artist book will be published by Pitzer College Art Galleries in conjunction with her 2015 solo exhibition and residency, Blacklisted: A Planted Allegory. A co-founder of the art space, Persbo Studio in Sweden, Yurshansky is the recipient of numerous grants and awards from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Asylum Arts, the Swedish Arts Grant Committee and the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm, where she was a Guest Artist Researcher and had a solo exhibition in 2015. She was the first international artist awarded the Maria Bonnier Stipend from Bonniers Konsthall. Yurshansky’s work has been exhibited internationally in group shows at the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, MAK Center, LAXART, the 7th Istanbul Biennial, the Hammer Museum, Rooseum Center for Contemporary Art in Malmö, and the Toyota Museum in Japan.

http://www.jennyyurshansky.com/

Karen Lee (b. 1980 in Los Angeles, lives and works in Brooklyn) received her MFA from SUNY Purchase in 2014 and her BA in Art and Art History from UCLA in 2004. In September 2016, Equity Gallery will present Lee’s first solo exhibition in New York. Her work has been shown in galleries and artist-run spaces including recent group exhibitions at Vanity Projects, New York; Scott Charmin, Houston; Lilac Museum, New York; Katzen Arts Center, Washington DC; and Paredon Blanco, Los Angeles. She has organized numerous collaborative exhibitions and events including Heaven at the Silverlake Lounge (2008-09) and Not A Speakeasy (2007).

http://www.karenmlee.com/
 Jenny Yurshansky 

Alexandra Pacheco Garcia

Alexandra Pacheco Garcia

 Jenny Yurshansky 

Karen Lee


Karen Lee